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North Eleuthera Coral Reef Assessments


In May, The Perry Institute partnered with the Bahamas National Trust (BNT), Cape Eleuthera Institute (CEI) and Stuart Cove’s Dive Bahamas to conduct Atlantic and Gulf Rapid Reef Assessment (AGRRA) surveys on the coral reefs of North Eleuthera.

The AGRRA method of assessment is essentially taking a rapid inventory of the fish, coral and benthic species (plants and animals on the sea floor) that are on coral reefs and helps us to understand its overall health. Coral reef health depends on complex relationships among the benthic, coral and fish communities. When changes occur in the dynamics of one of these components, the other components are affected and the whole relationship can be disrupted. To understand reef condition, AGRRA examines multiple indicators of the benthic-coral-fish relationships. With each diver trained to assess a specific component, the data collected will provide valuable baseline information for managers and government officials responsible for protecting coral reefs.

Though Bahamian coral reefs are feeling the pressure of various human impacts and global changes in the environment, we must continue our efforts in research, policy change, and community outreach to gradually reverse the decline of our coral reef biodiversity and our precious natural resources.

This project was funded by The Atlantis Blue Water Project and Disney Conservation Fund and supported by Valentine’s Dive Center in Harbour Island.


Meet Our Blogger - Alannah Vellacott

Alannah Vellacott is a Bahamian marine biologist and is currently an undergraduate student studying Ecology and Biology at South Dakota State University. Alannah is an experienced scuba diver and has participated in various research projects in The Bahamas. Alannah is the summer intern at The Perry Institute for Marine Science and travels The Bahamas conducting coral reef surveys and establishes and maintains coral nurseries in an effort to rehabilitate affected coral reefs as a part of the Reverse The Decline Project lead by The Perry Institute.